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Australia Alopecia Areata Foundation Inc.

Alopecia Areata is believed to be an immunological disease under genetic control, which disrupts the normal biology of the hair follicle. For more than 30 years, leading Dermatologists around the world have been studying hair growth patterns, genetic and immune theories, striving for a cure and an acceptable treatment for Alopecia Areata.

Today there is no cure! Today the treatments vary! Today we have hope!

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Promote positive image and respect for Alopecia Areata sufferers.
Assist individuals and families with coping strategies to live with Alopecia Areata.
Provide strategies against bullying / name calling.
Provide opportunities for Alopecia Areata sufferers to have a voice and participate in their communities
Increase awareness into our community about all forms of Alopecia Areata.
Attend schools to inform parents and school communities on the disease.
Raise funds into medical and psychological research.

JuliaWilsonJulia: Having Alopecia doesn’t have to be just bearable or just manageable. It will be part of you, but you can move on and it will not define you!
CatherineGrantCatherine - 21: Whether I have hair or not I am always thankful for what I have, rather on concentrating on what I don't have.
HeidiAHeidi: Alopecia isn’t something we should feel embarrassed or ashamed about.
stefStef: 16, telling her story through a poem.
camCam O'Rourke: 12, I first got AA in early 2010. It was a massive shock because it started off as just one tiny patch, and in about four weeks, it had all gone, apart from a couple of tiny patches.
MichelleMichelle: hair loss is something to be embraced. I'm ready for openness; I'm ready for people to be challenged; and I'm ready for bald women to feel empowered. I don't want to spend my life merely surviving as a bald woman. I'd much prefer to live.
SarahPSarah P: I’ve had ups and downs, I’ve been self conscious and I’ve been brave. I don’t know where I will be this time next year, or what my head will look like. But it’s an adventure, and its all part of my story.
JamesMillerJames Miller: Imagine you are 10 years old, and one morning you wake up to find you have a bald patch at the back of your head the size of a golf ball,this is what happened to me.
StellaStella 10 …..I’m VERY happy now in my school and I have a great family and friends and I’m happy to live a very bald and happy life!!!!!
Alex_WebAlex: Alison tells her story on son Alex ……We have a resilient, positive, strong willed young man. He may not have hair but he is healthy, wealthy and wise otherwise in his life – That’s the greatest gift of all!

News

Thank you Lacey for getting your community involved and promoting awareness into Alopecia ...

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We investigate potential causes of alopecia in polar bears.
Transcriptomics show enhanced immune and stress responses and viral defense.
Abstract

Populations of wildlife species worldwide experience incidents of mass morbidity and mortality. Primary or secondary drivers of these events may escape classical detection methods for identifying microbial insults, toxin exposure, or additional stressors. In 2012, 28% of polar bears sampled in a study in the southern Beaufort Sea region of Alaska had varying degrees of alopecia that was concomitant with reduced body condition. Concurrently, elevated numbers of sick or dead ringed seals were detected in the southern Beaufort, Chukchi, and Bering seas in 2012, resulting in the declaration of an unusual mortality event (UME) by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The primary and possible ancillary causative stressors of these events are unknown, and related physiological changes within individual animals have been undetectable using classical diagnostic methods. Here we present an emerging technology as a potentially guiding investigative approach aimed at elucidating the circumstances responsible for the susceptibility of certain polar bears to observed conditions. Using transcriptomic analysis we identified enhanced biological processes including immune response, viral defense, and response to stress in polar bears with alopecia. Our results support an alternative mechanism of investigation into the causative agents that, when used proactively, could serve as an early indicator for populations and species at risk. We suggest that current or classical methods for investigation into events of unusual morbidity and mortality can be costly, sometimes unfocused, and often inconclusive. Advances in technology allow for implementation of a holistic system of surveillance and investigation that could provide early warning of health concerns in wildlife species important to humans.
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A special thank you to mother/daughter team, Kellie and Karli, for their double donation! ...

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